Meetup – Valencia

Descubre todos los grupos de Meetup de Idiomas y cultura y únete a grupos de este tema con gente cerca de ti. (CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO GO TO “MEETUP”)

meet_up

3rd CONDITIONAL – HELP WITH PRONUNCIATION

LISTEN AND REPEAT.jpg

The following three audios are to help you with the pronunciation of the third conditional. Native speakers of English pronounce a double contraction, which non-natives find very difficult.

Follow the instructions below and you will certainly  improve. 

 

CONDITIONAL 3 PART 1

listen3

CONDITIONAL 3 PART 2

repeat

CONDITIONAL 3 PART 3

How did it go? Do you feel more confident now?

You could also try this lesson by the BBC: CLICK HERE-animated-small 2

 

 

New FREE tandem – organised by José Luis Albacete and Silvia Buyé

tandem

ORAL PRACTICE…

nerves

Oral test time is coming and I know many of you are getting nervous. So here are some ways to improve your speaking skills.

If you have the time and the energy to go to a real live Language Exchange meeting in Valencia –

CLICK HERE TO FIND A “TANDEM” (classified by day of the week)

If, on the other hand, you would rather chat online, then 

CLICK HERE TO SEE A LIST OF ONLINE CONVERSATION EXCHANGE WEBSITES

I HOPE THIS IS OF INTEREST TO YOU.  

CHEER UP – YOU ARE ALMOST THERE!!!

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TANDEM SERVICE…

agendaidiomas

 

AGENDAIDIOMAS1

NI-2 SONGS ABOUT WORKING

Songs About Work

WORK-WORK

FOR NEXT LESSON (MONDAY 2nd December) CHOOSE ONE OF THESE SONGS (or any other song about jobs and work that you know or find) AND FIND THE LYRICS. TELL THE CLASS WHAT IT IS ABOUT.

1. Tennessee Ernie Ford, “Sixteen Tons” 
2. Sam Cooke, “Chain Gang” 
3. Bob Dylan, “Maggie’s Farm”
4. Lonnie Donnegan, “My Old Man’s a Dustman” 
5. Glen Campbell, “Wichita Lineman”
6. Loretta Lynn, “One’s on the Way”
7. Rush, “Working Man”
8. Randy Newman, “Mr. President (Have Pity on the Working Man)”
9. Johnny Paycheck, “Take This Job and Shove It”
10. The Clash, “Career Opportunities”
11. John Prine, “Fish and Whistle”
12. Dolly Parton, “9 to 5″
13. Bruce Springsteen, “Atlantic City”
14. Utah Phillips, “Hallelujah, I’m a Bum”
15. Dire Straits, “Money for Nothing”
16. The Bangles, “Manic Monday”
17. Uncle Tupelo, “Grindstone”
18. Steve Earle, “Telephone Road”
19. Robbie Fulks, “Let’s Kill Saturday Night”
20. Belle and Sebastian, “White Collar Boy” 
21. “Blue Collar Man” Styx
22. “Working for a Living” Huey Lewis and The News
23. “She Works Hard for the Money” Donna Summer  
24. “Workin’ Man Blues” Merle Haggard
25. “This F***ing Job”  Drive-By Truckers
26. “Working for the Man” Roy Orbison
27. “It Sure Was Better Back Then” Steve Forbert 
28. “Dark as a Dungeon,” Merle Travis 
29. “Back on the Chain Gang” The Pretenders
30. “California Cottonfields” Merle Haggard
31.  “Millworker” James Taylor
32.  “Feel Like a Number” Bob Seger’
33.  “Minimum Wage” They Might Be Giants
34.  “Queen of the Supermarket” Bruce Springsteen
35.  “Don’t talk to me about work” Lou Reed
36.  “Hard Workin’ Man” Brooks and Dunn
37.  “Payday” by Boz Scaggs
38.  “Makin’Thunderbirds” Bob Seger
39.  “All Down the Line” Rolling Stones
40. “Hi-Ho, Hi-Ho” The Seven Dwarfs!!!

C1 – READING AND SPEAKING – CLARE’S LAW

READ THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE. THINK OF ARGUMENTS AGAINST AND IN FAVOUR OF THIS LAW.

Clare’s Law to cover all of England and Wales after pilot scheme

clare's law

Clare Wood met her ex-partner on Facebook and was unaware of his criminal record

Clare’s Law, which enables people to check the police record of their partners, is to be expanded to cover all of England and Wales.

It has been piloted in Greater Manchester, Wiltshire, Nottinghamshire and Gwent since September 2012. The scheme is named after Clare Wood, who was murdered by her ex-boyfriend George Appleton at her Salford home in February 2009. She was unaware of his history of violence against women.

The law is expected to take effect across England and Wales in March. Clare Wood’s father, Michael Brown, has welcomed plans to roll out the scheme, officially known as the Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme, saying the scheme “could, quite possibly, have saved her life”.

‘Escape if necessary’

During the pilot of Clare’s Law there were 111 disclosures in the four police areas involved. Home Secretary Theresa May, has issued a written statement to the House of Commons. She says that there “are still too many cases where vulnerable people are let down”.

“Clare’s Law provides people with the information they need to escape an abusive situation before it ends in tragedy,” she said.

“The national scheme will ensure that more people can make informed decisions about their relationship and escape if necessary.

“This is an important step towards ensuring we do better by women like Clare Wood in the future.”

Ms May said 88 women were killed by their partners last year.

‘Right-to-Ask’

The disclosure of people’s history of domestic violence can be triggered in two ways:

  • Right-to-Ask: the law will allow people to apply to police forces in England and Wales for information on a partner’s history of domestic violence
  • Right-to-Know: police can proactively disclose information in prescribed circumstances

A panel of police, probation services and other agencies will check every request to ensure it is necessary before trained police officers and advisers would then provide support to victims.

Extremely dangerous

Refuge, a charity which helps victims of domestic violence, is opposed to the rollout of Clare’s Law. They are calling for the government to open a public inquiry into the response of police to domestic violence.

The charity’s chief executive, Sandra Horley, says: “Clare’s Law may help a few individuals – but domestic violence is a huge social issue with a massive death toll. We need to help the majority of victims – not the few. Let’s get our priorities right.”

She also says that leaving a violent partner can be extremely dangerous: “women are at greatest risk of homicide at the point of separation or after leaving a violent partner”.

But chief executive of the charity Victim Support Javed Khan welcomed the plans.

“Early identification to stop domestic violence is crucial,” he said.

He also said that it is important to give people the “support they need both before and after a disclosure has been made, so they can make an informed choice about what to do next”.

New Domestic Violence Protection Orders are also being rolled out across England and Wales from next March.

These can be issued by a police officer at superintendent rank where they have reasonable grounds to believe a victim is at risk of future violent behaviour. The case for the protection order would have to be heard in a magistrates’ court within 48 hours.

A Scottish government spokesperson said domestic abuse was taken very seriously and that: “We will follow the rollout of this pilot across England and Wales with interest, in particular the evaluation, and consider the role that this initiative can play in Scotland.”

Police Scotland said tackling domestic abuse was a high priority and that their officers “regularly liaise with colleagues across forces in England and Wales and exchange information readily and as requested”.

In Northern Ireland, the Department for Justice said there were no plans to introduce their own version of Clare’s Law. “Such proposals would require local consultation and development.”

GLOSSARY:

roll out (n. Rollout) – apply, establish, introduce

trigger (OR trigger off) – bring about, cause, generate

disclosure – exposure, divulgence, revealment

death toll – number of deaths

tackle – deal with

liaise (with) – talk to each other and inform each other what they are doing, allowing efficient cooperation 

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